Lighting solution that fits seamlessly into the architecture

Mercedes-Benz Headquarters, Rome | IT

A welcoming and efficient work space, where personal wellbeing and the company’s productivity can be combined – this represents the new Mercedes-Benz headquarters in Rome, Italy, created by MPPM architects. Zumtobel teamed up with its sister brand Thorn to develop a specific lighting solution for each room of the new building to create the right lighting ambience.

Zumtobel lights up the Mercedes-Benz Headquarters in Rome
The new Mercedes-Benz headquarters in Rome, Italy, created by MPPM architects. © Moreno Maggi

The new Mercedes-Benz headquarters are located in the east area of Rome in an industrial area. Before the reconstruction, the company’s office consisted of six individual buildings. To improve the operational efficiency of Mercedes-Benz, the structure was combined to one building. The intervention included the demolition of one of the old buildings as well as the reconfiguration of a new one that incorporates two of the existing buildings to create one completely renovated edifice from the functional and architectural point of view.

Zumtobel lights up the Mercedes-Benz Headquarters in Rome
© Moreno Maggi

When MPPM architects designed the new open workspaces, great attention was paid to flexibility and modularity, as well as to optimise the use of connective spaces. The main design objective, however, was to create a welcoming and efficient work space, where personal and corporate wellbeing and productivity can be combined. From this point of view, the acoustic quality of the rooms was also important, as well as other equally important aspects such as the study of natural and artificial light.

On the ground floor you will find the main entrance hall, lobbies and common connecting areas, the conference area, the corporate restaurant and the large exhibition area. In each of these areas, the lighting was specifically designed and products used to ensure that the light was truly appropriate for the function, including in terms of emotional perception.

Thus, the main contribution of Zumtobel was to develop a specific lighting solution for each room type to create the right lighting ambience. The main entrance hall has been illuminated by integrating the luminaires into the architectural structure in order to better accompany the forms and enhance the materials used.

Zumtobel lights up the Mercedes-Benz Headquarters in Rome
INTRO illuminates the canteen which fits perfectly with the architectural language. © Moreno Maggi

PANOS infinity from Zumtobel was used for the functional lighting of the paths, TECTON for an effect of diffused indirect light that fills the central volume in double height. SUPERSYSTEM II characterizes the multifunctional spaces and INTRO illuminates the canteen which fits perfectly with the architectural language and the materials and finishes chosen for this environment.

Zumtobel lights up the Mercedes-Benz Headquarters in Rome
SUPERSYSTEM II characterizes the multifunctional spaces. © Moreno Maggi
Zumtobel lights up the Mercedes-Benz Headquarters in Rome
The offices were built with large recessed luminaires. © Moreno Maggi
Zumtobel lights up the Mercedes-Benz Headquarters in Rome
Omega LED from Thorn illuminates the offices. © Moreno Maggi

The three elevated floors house most of the offices and floor services. Here the study of lighting quality perceived in offices conducted by Zumtobel was of great importance, too. The open space offices and connections were mainly built with large recessed luminaires with optimum optics and technical specifications for this type of application, integrated as dimension and design in the modular ceiling systems with Omega LED from Thorn. The covered outdoor exhibition space was designed with high-power lighting fixtures in mind that are perfect for use in high ceilings, such as the Zumtobel CRAFT.

Zumtobel lights up the Mercedes-Benz Headquarters in Rome
The new Mercedes-Benz headquarters are located in the east area of Rome in an almost exclusively industrial area. © Moreno Maggi